Knowledge, representation, recognition in turbulent times

18 January 2019, 2-4pm, Room 2S5 (*room change*), Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education

Professor Lester-Irabinna Rigney (Kings College London & University of South Australia), with a response from Olivia Slater, (University of Cambridge)

    • What is Indigenist and Indigenism?
    • How does the colonizer share space with those it colonizes?
    • What are colonized solutions and perspectives?
    • Why is place so important to indigenous theory?

Readings:

  • Rigney, L. (2001) ‘A First Perspective of Indigenous Australian Participation in Science: Framing Indigenous Research Towards Indigenous Australian Intellectual Sovereignty,’ Kaurna Higher Education Journal, (7)1-13 – http://bit.ly/2RyVew7
  • Fredericks, B. (2009) ‘There is nothing that ‘identifies me to that place’ Indigenous
    Women’s Perceptions of Health Spaces and Places,’ Cultural Studies Review, 15 (2): 46-61 – http://bit.ly/2RFiWXA
  • Nakata, M. (2007) ‘The Cultural Interface. ((Re)Contesting Indigenous Knowledges & Indigenous Studies,’ 36 (1): 7-14 – http://bit.ly/2CTG0ts

Is another University possible?: Reflections on 50 years of black struggle at University of California San Diego

8 February 2019, 2-4pm, Room 2S3, Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education 

Danny Widener (University of California San Diego and fellow at CRASSH and Wolfson College during 2018-2019)

This talk examines three moments of racial crisis/unrest at UC San Diego in order to ask questions about the nominal role of education in social equality, the persistence and challenges of inter -ethnic coalitions, the present moment of managed diversity and Afropessimism, and the future of anti – racist struggle in elite research universities.

Readings:

Rodrick Ferguson, We Demand: The University and Student protests, Chapter 1 – http://bit.ly/2GS44RF Chapter 3 – http://bit.ly/2saFUaV Chapter 4 – http://bit.ly/2BYpGG9

The Erasures of Race and Racism in Education and International Development: Re-Reading the ‘global learning crisis’

22 February 2019, 2-4pm, Room 2S3, Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education

Panel Discussion with Professor Pauline Rose, Dr Arathi Sriprakash, Professor Leon Tikly and Sharon Walker (In collaboration with the REAL Centre)

Reading:

Sriprakash, A. Tikly, L. & Walker, S. (2019) ‘The erasures of racism in education and international development: re-reading the ‘global learning crisis’ Pre-proof draft http://bit.ly/2M5493q

Film Screening, Seminar, Paper and Discussion

1 March 2019, 2-5.30pm, Room 2S3, Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education

Screening of Lionel Ngakane’s Jemima & Johnny (1966)

Followed by Chris Jeppesen (Postdoctoral associate Jesus College, University of Cambridge) presenting his paper: ‘‘The most controversial children’s drama ever made’: Grange Hill, race, and comprehensive schooling in 1980s England’ with a response from Sharon Walker (University of Cambridge)

What was the meaning of Rhodes Must Fall? (Oxford, 2015-2016) and of Dismantling The Master’s House? (UCL, 2014-2015)

8th March 2019, 2pm-4pm, Room 2S3, Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education

Dr Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman, who was an academic ally in both these student-led social movements, theorises their meaning, from Black Queer-Trans perspectives, in retrospect and rearguard.

Dr Coleman is senior teaching associate (‘Sexuality and Society’ and ‘Modern Slavery: Issues and Debates) at the University of Bristol, and honorary research fellow in history at the University of Birmingham and sociology at the University of Warwick – where, with the Global Warwickshire Collective, they facilitate ‘Windrush Strikes Back: Decolonising Warwickshire’.

Readings:

On Rhodes Must Fall

On Dismantling the Master’s House



The group is convened by: