An experimental project working towards the meta-conference

By Mark Carrigan This post is a short overview of the live blogging project Pat Thomson and myself initiated at The Sociological Review’s Undisciplining conference last week. This was a participatory project which invited twelve conference attendees (and one participating remotely) to blog about their experiences as they made their way through this three day event. There … Continue reading An experimental project working towards the meta-conference

Knowledge production outside the university at #undisciplining

By Mark Carrigan I'm writing this from the Undisciplining conference, an event I've contributed to the organisation of as part of my role at The Sociological Review Foundation. An event is about to start organised by my CPGJ colleague and collaborator, Jana Bacevic, prepared through an initial blog post on this website. Her session on thinking knowledge … Continue reading Knowledge production outside the university at #undisciplining

A dialogue between ontology and epistemology

An announcement concerning the upcoming EARLI Conference hosted at the Faculty of Education: You may be aware of a conference taking place here, at the Faculty of Education, on August 27th-28th 2018. This is being co-organised by two special interest groups (‘Methods in Learning Research’ [SIG17] and ‘Educational Theory’ [SIG25]) of the European Association of Research … Continue reading A dialogue between ontology and epistemology

Thinking knowledge production without the university

This is a collaborative blog post leading up to the panel Undisciplining: thinking knowledge production without the university at The Sociological Review's annual conference Undisciplining: conversations from the edges, Newcastle, Gateshead, 18-21 June 2018. Introduction Jana Bacevic If it is true that it is easier to imagine the end of the world than the end … Continue reading Thinking knowledge production without the university

Human agency beyond platform structuralism and platform voluntarism

By Mark Carrigan In the last year, I find myself obsessing ever more fequently about agency and platforms. Given I spent six years writing a PhD about human agency, it is inevitable that this would be the lens I bring to the analysis of platforms. But it also reflects a sustained weakness in how the … Continue reading Human agency beyond platform structuralism and platform voluntarism