Fast Scholarship, Emerging Technologies and The Future of Inquiry

By Mark Carrigan and William Housley Distributed networked technologies have transformed communication, produced new forms of ‘data’ and have had a significant effect on the way in which knowledge is produced. From crowdsourcing data annotation and the feature identification of massive data sets as an aspect of ‘citizen science’ to the use of Twitter to … Continue reading Fast Scholarship, Emerging Technologies and The Future of Inquiry

Let’s talk about racism in education and international development

By Arathi Sriprakash Issues of racism within the field of education and international development are rarely addressed directly, despite profoundly shaping our research, policy and practice. This ‘area of silence’ means that we haven’t adequately developed the concepts or approaches to understand the operations of racism in our work. There is an urgent imperative to do … Continue reading Let’s talk about racism in education and international development

Strategic ignorance, political elites, and the false economy of education privatisation

By Susan L. Robertson I often puzzle over how it is that, though we know so much about the spectacular failures of privatisation initiatives in the social and education sectors, international agencies and governments - from the UK to the USA and Liberia - continue to be hell-bent on pursuing more, and not less, of … Continue reading Strategic ignorance, political elites, and the false economy of education privatisation

Universities, neoliberalisation, and the (im)possibility of critique

By Jana Bacevic Last Friday in April, I was at a conference entitled Universities, neoliberalisation and (in)equality at Goldsmiths, University of London. It was an one-day event featuring presentations and interventions from academics who work on understanding, and criticising, the transformation of working conditions in neoliberal academia. Besides sharing these concerns, attending such events is part of … Continue reading Universities, neoliberalisation, and the (im)possibility of critique