Between legitimation and imagination: epistemic attachment, ontological bias, and thinking about the future

By Jana Bacevic A serious line of division runs through my household. It does not concern politics, music, or even sports: it concerns the possibility of large-scale collapse of social and political order, which I consider very likely. Specific scenarios aside for the time being, let’s just say we are talking more human-made climate-change-induced breakdown … Continue reading Between legitimation and imagination: epistemic attachment, ontological bias, and thinking about the future

Acts of Im(p)unity: A Tale About Education, Commercialisation and Current Trade Deals

By Susan L. Robertson Imagine you were located in a community, and used the human and natural resources of that community to run your business. Somehow you had managed to convince the local political elites that you be accorded special status; one which meant you and your business activities were immune to the ongoing democratic … Continue reading Acts of Im(p)unity: A Tale About Education, Commercialisation and Current Trade Deals

Fast Scholarship, Emerging Technologies and The Future of Inquiry

By Mark Carrigan and William Housley Distributed networked technologies have transformed communication, produced new forms of ‘data’ and have had a significant effect on the way in which knowledge is produced. From crowdsourcing data annotation and the feature identification of massive data sets as an aspect of ‘citizen science’ to the use of Twitter to … Continue reading Fast Scholarship, Emerging Technologies and The Future of Inquiry

Let’s talk about racism in education and international development

By Arathi Sriprakash Issues of racism within the field of education and international development are rarely addressed directly, despite profoundly shaping our research, policy and practice. This ‘area of silence’ means that we haven’t adequately developed the concepts or approaches to understand the operations of racism in our work. There is an urgent imperative to do … Continue reading Let’s talk about racism in education and international development

Strategic ignorance, political elites, and the false economy of education privatisation

By Susan L. Robertson I often puzzle over how it is that, though we know so much about the spectacular failures of privatisation initiatives in the social and education sectors, international agencies and governments - from the UK to the USA and Liberia - continue to be hell-bent on pursuing more, and not less, of … Continue reading Strategic ignorance, political elites, and the false economy of education privatisation